Manchester Institute of Innovation Research

MIOIR@ESOF2016

The Manchester Institute of Innovation Research was out in force at the 2016 Euroscience Open Forum held in Manchester from 24 - 27 July. 

In addition to the ESOF conference, we hosted in partnership with the University of Manchester's Centre for the History of Science and Technology and Medicine, the annual Fred Jevons Science Policy lecture on Monday 25 July at Manchester Town Hall. The 2016 lecturer was Lord Willetts of Havant, the former UK Minister for Universities and Science. 

Sessions involving members of the Institute at ESOF are outlined below. 

 

SUNDAY 24 JULY 


Opening Doors on Responsible Research and Innovation        

09.15 - 13.30

Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) is an important new concept in science and society and one of the cross-cutting themes of the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 programme. Drawing together long-standing perspectives including public participation, ethics and gender in science, RRI has the potential to offer new opportunities but also challenges for everyone involved in science and innovation.

This session will offer an overview of ‘Translating  Responsible Research and Innovation  Policies into Practice’, and then break in to four sessions covering:

·         RRI training workshop: hands on responsible research and innovation

·         Societal Impact of science policy: the application  of RRI: Good  practice from  countries and regions

·         What is the revolutionary potential of RRI? Interdisciplinary discussion of innovative  participation processes

·         Three Currencies of research : excellence, profit and ... responsibility

The event will close with a discussion of the past, present and future of responsible research and innovation. 


MONDAY 25 JULY 


Industrial innovation: managing the ecosystem (Science to Business)         

15:45-17:00

Many firms operate in global innovation ecosystems across a patchwork of industrial and innovation policy landscapes. We will showcase the first results from a major survey examining changes in innovation management and practice across a diverse range of industry sectors in 11 EU member states. The panel of senior industrial managers and policymakers will discuss the implications of these findings around the four propositions.

1)                  How are new innovation process and tools used? A CTO’s toolbox now includes ‘open innovation’, global knowledge networks, talent-scouting, social media, crowd sourcing, new IPR provisions and PPPs. How are these tools used by different industries and company? What is ‘best practice’ now?

2)                  Many European companies still approach innovation as a linear process. Can these companies continue to be competitive?

3)                  Does open innovation support competitive partnerships and alliances?

4)                  How do firms manage overlapping regional, national and global agendas, and do they benefit from fragmentation? What should the role of different levels of policy be?

Session Organiser Lisa Dale-Clough, Manchester Institute of Innovation Research, The University of Manchester, UK

Speakers

Lisa Dale-Clough, Manchester Institute of Innovation Research, The University of Manchester, UK

Peter Dröll, DG for Research & Innovation, European Commission          

Bernd Korves, Head of Visioning & Scouting at Siemens Corporate Technology 

Erkki Ormala, Aalto University, Finland 


Synthetic biology and the new bio-industrial revolution (Bio-Revolution)

15:45-18:15

Synthetic biology has the potential both to transform the industrial landscape across all sectors - including healthcare, sustainable energy, green chemistry, pharmaceuticals, novel materials and bioremediation - and to address major societal challenges.  Visionaries of synthetic biology, together with ethicists and social scientists from the SYNENERGENE project will anticipate future applications for synthetic biology and reflect on their ethical and societal implications.

Session Organiser Ros Le Feuvre, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, The University of Manchester, UK

Speakers

Rainer Breitling, Institute of Biotechnology, The University of Manchester, UK

George Guo-Qiang Chen, Chinese Academy of Sciences              

Lionel Clarke, UK Synthetic Biology Leadership Council 

Christopher Coenen, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany

Stefano Crabu, University of Padova, Italy

Sarah O'Connor, John Innes Centre, UK

Philip Shapira, Manchester Institute of Innovation Research, The University of Manchester, UK

Dirk Stemerding, Rathenau Instituut, The Netherlands

Marjoleine van der Meij, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Martin Warren, University of Kent, UK 


TUESDAY 26 JULY 


Synthetic biology, the pathway to commercialisation (Science to Business)

08:30-09:45

The emerging science of synthetic biology (SynBio) has the potential to transform the industrial landscape in sustainable manufacturing processes across industrial sectors, such as healthcare, sustainable energy, green chemistry, pharmaceuticals, novel materials and bioremediation, and to address major societal grand challenges.

However, the effective commercialisation will require us to address a number of challenges including a properly trained workforce, changes to manufacturing, appropriate legal and governance frameworks, physical infrastructure, understanding and mitigation of risks, and SOPs for safe working with the GM organisms. Public acceptance and endorsement of SynBio products is essential in their commercial viability together with an understanding and early consideration of the societal impact of the changes to processes. Commercial exploitation of SynBio applications will thus require confluence of new enabling tools and clear understanding of the current state and readiness of the science and industry. This panel debate will discuss these challenges in an open forum.

Session Organiser Ros Le Feuvre, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, The University of Manchester

Speakers

Murray Brown, GlaxoSmithKline, UK

Linda Kahl, BioBricks Foundation, USA

Ros Le Feuvre, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, The University of Manchester, UK

Kris Matykiewicz, The University of Manchester, UK

Philip Shapira, Manchester Institute of Innovation Research, The University of Manchester, UK

Axel Trefzer, ThermoFisher, UK

Sean Ward, Synthace Ltd, UK 


What drives interdisciplinary excellence?  (Science for policy and policy for science)

12:50-14:05

The quest for scientific excellence has become a global driver for universities and research institutions. In virtually every country, governments, citizens and industry look towards science to find solutions to the so-called grand challenges of our time such as climate change, food security and sustainable resources. None of these solutions will be delivered without a comprehensive interdisciplinary effort and pioneering research across the different scientific disciplines. Nevertheless, many questions remain unresolved. What is the right balance between disciplinary capacity-building and interdisciplinary collaboration? How should talent and recruitment strategies be designed in order to reach the optimum interdisciplinary excellence? What are the challenges for interdisciplinary peer review and funding in an academic world based on disciplinary performance indicators?  By exploring some of the most promising strategies that the European Union, Canada, Denmark and UK have adopted to promote interdisciplinary excellence and top-quality research, we will reflect upon past, present and future drivers of interdisciplinary research, and set the agenda for academic leadership in the future.

Session Organiser David Budtz Pedersen, Aalborg University Copenhagen, Denmark

Speakers

Thomas Bjørnholm, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Jean-Pierre Bourguignon, European Research Council

Suzanne Fortier, McGill University, Canada

Luke Georghiou, The University of Manchester, UK

Wilhelm Krull, Volkswagen Foundation, Germany

Moderator David Budtz Pedersen, Aalborg University Copenhagen, Denmark


The ghost of science past (Science in our cultures)

12:50-14:05

Science is overwhelmingly produced in cities. Historians of science and geographers have emphasised the importance of place – nations, regions, cities and sites such as university laboratories or museums – to science. But places are also shaped and reshaped by science: the development of science and technology, like industry, leaves obdurate traces – a heritage of buildings and infrastructure that serves to inspire, shape and constrain further developments. We will explore cases of how past science and technology developments, and their legacies, have framed and are framing current debates about economic development, drawing lessons for the future.

Session Organiser Kieron Flanagan, Manchester Institute of Innovation Research, The University of Manchester, UK

Speakers

Alice Cliff, Museum of Science and Industry (MOSI), UK

Edurne Magro, University of Deusto, Spain

Jesus M. Valdaliso, University of the Basque Country, Spain


Value of research (Science for policy and policy for science)

17:10-18:25 

Research and innovation lie at the heart of most developed countries’ economic strategies and make a critical contribution to the development of their society and cultures. They are a key source of new jobs, growth and competitiveness and address societal challenges. Nonetheless there appears to be a constant challenge to the value of research in the competition for public investment. In this session a panel of senior policy advisers will discuss what is the value of research, particularly of a more fundamental/investigator driven nature. Questions for discussion will include: What are the key pathways by which value is generated? What is the evidence for an economic return on investment? What is the non-monetary value of research? What evidence is needed to convince sceptical politicians and the public that research is a good investment?

Session Organiser Luke Georghiou, The University of Manchester, UK

Speakers

Mark Ferguson, Chief Scientific Adviser to the Government of Ireland

Marja Makarow, Academy of Finland

Rongping Mu, Institute of Policy and Management, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 Luc Soete, Maastricht University, The Netherlands

Moderator Luke Georghiou, The University of Manchester, UK 


WEDNESDAY 27 JULY


The future of science and innovation policy – towards radical change (Science for policy and policy for science)

10:00-11:15 

The basic rationales for and approaches of science, technology and innovation (STI) policy are remarkably similar across OECD countries, and generally aim at addressing “market and system failures” through a range of actions which shape the conditions for STI. The dominant model underpinning STI policy is national (or regional) competition, with STI seen as a major source for growth. Despite some basic uniformity in approaches, countries differ in their balance of instruments and in the ways STI policy is organised. However, the expectations for STI policy to deliver socio-economic impact and to solve societal challenges have grown, while budgets are increasingly under stress.

Motivated by increasing irritation across the STI communities (academic, policy, industry, science) about the growing demand for STI to deliver, and in the absence of a considered debate around the profound challenges faced by science and innovation systems, we seek to stir debate about STI policy by asking radical questions and challenging the accepted rationales. Such questions might include: has the national competition model of STI policy failed to deliver; should STI policy stop supporting large firms altogether; should we separate science and innovation policy; is the design, implementation and proper assessment of an STI “policy mix” really possible?

Session Organiser Executive Committee European Forum for Studies of Policies for Research and Innovation (EU SPRI), represented by Jakob Edler, Manchester Institute of Innovation Research, The University of Manchester, UK

Speakers

Jakob Edler, Manchester Institute of Innovation Research, The University of Manchester, UK

Stefan Kuhlmann, University of Twente, The Netherlands

Robert-Jan Smits, DG Research and Innovation, European Commission

Youngah Park, Korea Institute of S&T Evaluation and Planning, South Korea

Maria Villaveces, Colombian Association for the Advancement of Science-ACAC 


ERC: ten years of funding frontier research (Science for policy and policy for science)

11:25-12:40 

Since its creation in 2007, the European Research Council (ERC) has spent more than €8 billion on 'frontier research', funding almost 5000 research projects across the EU and associated countries. It has been called a 'success story', a 'beacon of European research policy', and the 'gold standard'. It awards large grants to researchers on a competitive basis, but maybe even more importantly it creates a European currency called 'excellence' that is both symbolic and powerful. How did the ERC come about? What are the premises of its success, and what are the lasting tensions with which it has to grapple? What is the outlook for this institution? And what has it really achieved?

Session Organiser Thomas König, Institute for Advanced Studies (IHS), Austria

Speakers

Dan Brändström, Riksbank Jubileumsfond, Sweden

Jens Degett, European Union of Science Journalists' Associations            

Pavel Exner, Doppler Institute for Mathematical Physics and Applied Mathematics, Czech Republic

Thomas König, Institute for Advanced Studies (IHS), Austria

Maria Nedeva, Manchester Institute of Innovation Research, The University of Manchester, UK


 

 

 

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